Channel 4 Development Agreement

12.The Digital Economy Act 2010 extended channel 4`s scope to a number of qualitative requirements that for the first time covered the entire portfolio and not just the main channel. It should “create a wide range of relevant, high-quality media content that, taken as a whole, responds to the tastes and interests of a culturally diverse society”; high-quality films, news and current events; Content for older children and young adults, as well as through a large number of channels and digital platforms. In addition, the channel should support young and innovative talent, spark well-informed debate and promote “alternative views and new perspectives” in order to “provide access to material intended to inspire people to change their lives”.8 Alex Mahon, Chief Executive of Channel 4, said: “This is a revolutionary new partnership between Channel 4 and Pact, It`s about the fact that we`re both fit to operate in the digital age. For the first time, we have the full freedom to innovate, as content created in partnership with indies appears on demand and channels. Channel 4 exists to support our creative sector, and so it`s incredibly important that this agreement, unlike many of our new digital competitors, ensures that independent producers can fully benefit from the intellectual property they have created. It`s about the fact that Channel 4 is an increasingly attractive creative partner. 18.In the discussions that preceded the Broadcasting Act 1981, there was a powerful lobby to make the fourth channel a purely commercial operation as a second channel for ITV. But this idea was rejected by Margaret Thatcher, then Prime Minister and Home Minister, who opted for the publicly-owned non-profit model, with a special mandate and the duty to commission their programmes from independent producers. 19.In 1988, the government`s White Paper, released in the 90s, was privatisation as the first option for the future of Channel 4. But after lobbying michael Grade, its chief executive, who argued that the government could have “a privatized channel or a public service channel, but not both,” the government again rejected the idea.13 11.La 2004 Channel 4 license also included quotas for a minimum share of qualified original production that was to be commissioned by independent producers; quotas for production outside London; quotas for a certain minimum proportion of programmes available for the channel; and requirements for British news, current business and school curricula. In addition, Channel 4 had a specific mission to demonstrate innovation, experimentation and creativity; address the taste and interests of a culturally diverse society; to make an “essential contribution” to the dissemination by PES of programmes of a pedagogical and educational nature; 7 Developments: The process of implementing contracts is largely similar to that of programmes. You must agree on the development objective and delivery requirements with the Commissioning Editor.

You should speak to the Production Finance and/or Legal and Business Affairs Manager to discuss labour costs and contractual terms. Channel 4 requires the security of ownership of the rights to the development work and decides within 9 months of the full delivery of the development works of the commissioning or not of the production. . . .